Archive for the 'The Truths on Obesity' Category

Being Overweight Predicts Poor Health Outcome with Age

March 14, 2017

A recent study has come out from the recent Epidimeology and Preventive/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific sessions showing that indeed Obesity in the youger age predicts future poor health outcomes.  At most what is affected is poor physical performance including poor walking speed and grip strength.

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“To examine this, Vu and colleagues analyzed findings from participants the Chicago Healthy Aging study, a subset of the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project, which enrolled 39,565 participants from Chicago workplaces who were 18 to 74 during 1967–1973.

The researchers had complete data from 1325 men and women who were examined at baseline and again from 2007 to 2010.

The three measures of physical performance at follow-up were: hand-grip strength, 4-m walking speed, and the SPPB score—a composite score of 4-m walking speed, time to rise from a seated position, and standing balance, for a total score of 0 (worst) to 12 (best).

The participants were classed into six groups depending on their baseline BMI and change in weight after 39 years:

BMI >25 kg/m2; >10-pound weight loss (n=50).

BMI <25 kg/m2; 10-pound weight loss up to a 20-pound weight gain (n=319; reference group; minimal weight change).

BMI <25 kg/m2; >20-pound weight gain (n=312).

BMI >25 kg/m2; >10-pound weight loss (n=130).

BMI >25 kg/m2; 10-pound weight loss up to a 20-pound weight gain (n=300).

BMI >25 kg/m2; >20-pound weight gain (n=214).

About a quarter of the sample (29%) were women and 9% were black.

At follow-up, 10.3% of the participants had a low SPPB score (≤8); 8.4% had slow walking speed (<0.8 m/s on a 4-m course); and 23.8% had low sex-specific handgrip strength (<18 kg for women and <30 kg for men).

Compared with participants with a normal initial BMI and minimal weight change at the follow-up examination, those who were initially overweight and had gained the most weight (>20 pounds) were significantly more likely to have a low SPPB score, a slow walking speed, or low sex-specific handgrip strength (odds ratios 4.55, 4.58, and 1.86, respectively, after adjustment for sex, race, initial cardiovascular disease risk factors, and current age, education, ankle-brachial index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking status, diabetes, cholesterol, and blood-pressure medication use).

Similarly, compared with the reference group, those who were initially overweight or obese and lost less than 10 pounds or gained up to 20 pounds were significantly more likely to have a low SPPB score or a low sex-specific handgrip strength (ORs 2.11 and 1.59, respectively)”

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Bottom line is:

We better shape up and invest in our health for a better physical well being when old age comes!!!!

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Is Frying Foods Bad for the Health?

February 16, 2012

Almost a resounding YES! Until recently the British Medical Journal 2012 published an article that looked at frying and the risk of heart disease. The data will otherwise give us a smile for most who love frying as a way to cook and enjoy food!

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Abstract

Objective To assess the association between consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease.
Design Prospective cohort study.
Setting Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Participants 40,757 adults aged 29-69 and free of coronary heart disease at baseline (1992-6), followed up until 2004.
Main outcome measures Coronary heart disease events and vital status identified by record linkage with hospital discharge registers, population based registers of myocardial infarction, and mortality registers.
Results During a median follow-up of 11 years, 606 coronary heart disease events and 1,135 deaths from all causes occurred. Compared with being in the first (lowest) quarter of fried food consumption, the multivariate hazard ratio of coronary heart disease in the second quarter was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.45), in the third quarter was 1.07 (0.83 to 1.38), and in the fourth quarter was 1.08 (0.82 to 1.43; P for trend 0.74). The results did not vary between those who used olive oil for frying and those who used sunflower oil. Likewise, no association was observed between fried food consumption and all cause mortality: multivariate hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest quarter of fried food consumption was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 1.14; P for trend 0.98).
Conclusion In Spain, a Mediterranean country where olive or sunflower oil is used for frying, the consumption of fried foods was not associated with coronary heart disease or with all cause mortality.

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It is always our notion that frying is really bad. Foods that are fried lose water and instead take up fat and increase the caloric density of the food that is fried.  Worst is when the oil is reused as one loses the healthier unsaturated fat and instead increases the amount of the unhealthiest fat which is the trans fat!  What is known is that the risk of obesity and overweight strongly correlated with eating fried foods but this is the only study so far that has evaluated prospectively the relationship between fried foods and cardiovascular disease.

In this study Olive oil or Sunflower oil were used.  Of the total amount of fried food consumed, 24% (34 g/day) was fish, 22% (31 g/day) meat, 21% (30 g/day) potatoes, and 11% (15 g/day) eggs.

In this study population, the detailed analysis of the Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition significantly found no association between consumption of fried food and risk of coronary heart disease or all cause mortality.

Some explanations can be made:

1. The oil used in the study was mainly olive and sunflower rather than solid fat.  Olive oils is less prone to oxidation than other edible oils or fat.

2. We are not talking here of fried food in Fast food Burger joints where oils used in deep frying are reused several times and therefore unhealthy!

3. The analysis should not be made to say that fried chips or snacks therefore are safe because the study population here has low consumption of fried snacks that are usually loaded with salt.

This is indeed an exciting development in the field of FRYING!

Just the same..choose foods wisely ….

Choose Healthy!

What Makes Us OVEREAT….

January 4, 2012

Let me share with you one nice article from theHarvard Medical School publication: HealthBeat on what makes people overeat…

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How stress can make us overeat

It’s been another hectic day. On impulse, you grab an extra-large candy bar during your afternoon break. You plan to take just a few bites. But before you know it, you’ve polished off the whole thing — and, at least temporarily, you may feel better.

Rest assured you’re not alone. Stress, the hormones it unleashes, and the effects of high-fat, sugary “comfort foods” push people toward overeating.

Effects on appetite

In the short term, stress can shut down appetite. A structure in the brain called the hypothalamus releases corticotropin-releasing hormone, which suppresses appetite. The brain also sends messages to the adrenal glands atop the kidneys to pump out the hormone epinephrine (also known as adrenaline). Epinephrine helps trigger the body’s fight-or-flight response, a revved-up physiological state that temporarily puts eating on hold.

But if stress persists — or is perceived as persisting — it’s a different story. The adrenal glands release another hormone called cortisol, and cortisol increases appetite and may also ramp up motivation in general, including the motivation to eat. Once a stressful episode is over, cortisol levels should fall, but if the stress doesn’t go away — or if a person’s stress response gets stuck in the “on” position — cortisol may stay elevated.

Fat and sugar cravings

Stress also seems to affect food preferences. Numerous studies — granted, many of them in animals — have shown that physical or emotional distress increases the intake of food high in fat, sugar, or both. High cortisol levels, in combination with high insulin levels, may be responsible. Other research suggests that ghrelin, a “hunger hormone,” may have a role.

Once ingested, fat- and sugar-filled foods seem to have a feedback effect that inhibits activity in the parts of the brain that produce and process stress and related emotions. So part of our stress-induced craving for those foods may be that they counteract stress.

Of course, overeating isn’t the only stress-related behavior that can add pounds. Stressed people lose sleep, exercise less, and drink more alcohol, all of which can contribute to becoming overweight.

Different responses

Some research suggests a gender difference in stress-coping behavior, with women being more likely to turn to food and men to alcohol or smoking. A Finnish study that included over 5,000 men and women showed that obesity was associated with stress-related eating in women but not in men. Other research has shown that high stress levels lead to weight gain in both women and men, but the effect is typically greater in men.

Harvard researchers have reported that stress from work and other sorts of problems correlates with weight gain, but only in those who were overweight at the beginning of the study period. One explanation: overweight people have elevated insulin levels, and stress-related weight gain is more likely to occur in the presence of high insulin.

How much cortisol people produce in response to stress may also factor into the stress–weight gain equation. Several years ago, British researchers designed an ingenious study that showed that people who responded to stress with high cortisol levels in an experimental setting were more likely to snack in response to daily hassles in their regular lives than low-cortisol responders.

Steps you can take

Stress reduction is a growth industry these days.

There are dozens of things to try. Here are three suggestions:

    1. Meditate. Countless studies show that meditation reduces stress, although much of the research has focused on high blood pressure and heart disease. Meditation may also help you be more mindful of food choices. With practice, a person may be able to pay better attention to the impulse to grab a fat- and sugar-loaded comfort food and inhibit the impulse.
   2.  Exercise more. Intense exercise increases cortisol levels temporarily, but low-intensity exercise seems to reduce them. University of California researchers reported results in 2010 that exercise — and this was vigorous exercise — may blunt some of the negative effects of stress. Some activities, such as yoga and tai chi, have elements of both exercise and meditation.
    3. Visit with friends. Social support seems to have a buffering effect on the stress people experience. For example, researchers have found that the mental health of people working in stressful situations, like hospital emergency departments, is better if they receive it. But even those of us who live and work in situations where the stakes aren’t as high will, as Lennon and McCartney suggested, be better off if we get a little help from our friends.

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Steps you can do to reduce stress anytime of the the day…

Bad Habits to avoid when stressed!

Sound Simple and Pure…

 

How To Lose Weight: A Novel Way To Teach Kids About Proper Nutrition

December 24, 2011

Recent article published in AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH brings us back to how fast our world is becoming obese and how slow we have been in addressing this issue.  The temptation to eat and the lack of discipline to follow what is right and adequate make each one of us vulnerable to this dreaded condition we call Obesity.

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Objectives. We examined the effect of an intervention to provide caloric information about sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on the number of SSB purchases.

Methods. We used a case-crossover design with 4 corner stores located in low-income, predominately Black neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland. The intervention randomly posted 1 of 3 signs with the following caloric information: (1) absolute caloric count, (2) percentage of total recommended daily intake, and (3) physical activity equivalent. We collected data for 1600 beverage sales by Black adolescents, aged 12–18 years, including 400 during a baseline period and 400 for each of the 3 caloric condition interventions.

Results. Providing Black adolescents with any caloric information significantly reduced the odds of SSB purchases relative to the baseline (odds ratio [OR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36, 0.89). When examining the 3 caloric conditions separately, the significant effect was observed when caloric information was provided as a physical activity equivalent (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.85).

Conclusions. Providing easily understandable caloric information—particularly a physical activity equivalent—may reduce calorie intake from SSBs among low-income, Black adolescents.

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The study tells us one thing:

Letting out kids understand the nutrition information of the food they eat versus telling them how long they have to workout or exercise to burn the calories can make a difference.

The impact was noticeable more if kids understand how long they have to run to burn the amount of calories they ingested from the sugary drinks.  The easier it is for everyone to understand the equivalent amount of physical activity of what we take in makes sense.  You get a clearer picture of what you need to do to burn those calories.

A great article and a great wake up call for everyone.

AACE Philippines as part of our advocacy is providing modules to Grade school students on the Power of Prevention Through Fitness and Nutrition or POPFTN. For this year, we already have started the program and involved the Grade 5 students of St Bennedicts and for January, we will go to PAREF Springadale both in Cebu.  AACE Philippines as an organization composed of Endocrine Specialists dealing with Diabetes, Obesity and endocrine diseases hope to make a difference in the early lives of these kids.

Heres A Simple Way To Lose Weight…

September 11, 2010

Go to fullsize imageJust being too busy or just plain lazy, we have many excuses why we cant exercise.  Too stressed out at work gives us the reason to indulge in  food that we feel comfortable and happy.  But outcomes do matter and weight gain spells disaster.

We have heard of fad diets that do work but temporarily.  It still boils down to strict discipline and watching carefully what we eat and following the right regimen to the right activity.  We all know that… we heard that advice in the news, in the magazine so what esle is new?  Something that is simple and so close within your grabs but never thought about it?

Well heres something interesting and novel study  that was presented at the 2010 National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston:

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The study included 48 adults between age 55 and 75 who were divided into two groups.  The study participants drank about 1.5 cups of water per day prior to joining in the study.

One group drank two cups of water before meals and the other didn’t. All participants ate a low-calorie diet throughout the study.

After 12 weeks, water drinkers lost about 15.5 pounds, compared to non-water-drinking dieters, who lost only 11 pounds.

Not only were those who drank water before meals more successful after 12 weeks, but they also kept “the weight off for a full year after the weight loss study.”  Even better, most water drinkers, followed for an additional 12 months, not only kept weight off but “even lost another 1 to 2 pounds”.

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The study is really not novel in idea but for the first time, a scientific study has been done to substantiate what I have been recommending to my patients who are diabetics and overweight.  It is a smple formula of dirinking water before each meal to allow one to feel full and therefore less hungry.  By doing so, one tends to be more careful with what one eats and therefore has the best  chance of losing weight or maintaining it.

Water is still the best to fill you up…. its available 24 hours and free.  How much water do I recommend one to take daily?

I recommend at least 8- 10 glasses of water for women and up to 14 glasses for men!

But remember.. to be successful means the triad of discipline, low calorie healthy food and the right amount of exercise! Now ADD Plenty of WATER!!!!

Simple regimen to lose weight…TRY IT!

How Much Exercise is Needed to Lose the FAT?

November 26, 2009

It has been known that losing weight is a game of discipline and balance… Balance between food intake and physical activity. 

But what is not known is how much activity is needed to lose the fat inside the viscera or  abdomen known to be the Bad Fat!  Remember if you want to lose weight: the equation is more toward lesser intake of FOOD…  while If you want physical conditining and maintenance of weight, the balance points more to physical activity.

Now comes this interesting data that looked at this particular question.  How much exercise does one need to lose fat?  The study was published in journal  Obesity, Oct 8, 2009

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The purpose of this study was to determine what effect aerobic and resistance exercise training has on gain of visceral fat during the year following weight loss.

After being randomly assigned to aerobic training, resistance training, or no exercise training, 45 European-American (EA) and 52 African-American (AA) women lost 12.3 plusminus 2.5 kg on a 800 kcal/day diet. Computed tomography was used to measure abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, whereas total fat and regional fat (leg, arm, and trunk) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry after weight loss and 1 year following the weight loss. Because not all the subjects adhered to the 2 time/week 40 min/day exercise training during the 1-year follow-up, subjects were divided into five groups for analysis: aerobic adherers, aerobic nonadherers, resistance adherers, resistance nonadherers, and no exercise.

No significant differences were observed between the aerobic training and resistance training adherers for any variable. However, the aerobic (3.1 kg) and resistance (3.9 kg) exercise adherers gained less weight than any of the other three groups (all >6.2 kg).

In addition, the two exercise adherence groups did not significantly increase visceral fat (<0.8%) as compared with the 38% increase for the two nonadhering exercise groups and the 25% for the nonexercise group.

In Conclusion:

 As little as 80 min/week aerobic or resistance training had modest positive effects on preventing weight regain following a diet-induced weight loss. More importantly, both aerobic and resistance training prevented regain of potentially harmful visceral fat.

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I have been a  believer of this fact… that relying heavily on physical activity alone to help one lose weight is doomed to fail.  One needs to brisk walk for example around 70 minutes to burn 250 calories while eating french fries in a 5 minute snack time will already give you 320 calories!!!!

The above study points out the balance between cutting calories and physical activity.  The mere 80min per week exercise resulted in the prevention of weight regain after a diet induced weight loss … especially the prevention of the regain of the visceral fat which is considered the Bad fat!

Now that is definitely not difficult to do!!!!  How much more if we do physical activity on a daily basis?  Once you get used to it…you’re hooked. 

An example of being hooked: Just last night for example, I have to be in a symposium to give a lecture to cardiologists…but I really squeezed in at least a 20 min run prior to preparing for my talk…boy was it exhilirating to have sweat it out and boy was it refreshing afterwards!

No more excuses….

A little of something is better than Nothing….

High Protein Diet and Alzheimers’ Dsiease: Is There a Link?

October 27, 2009

Go to fullsize imageThe famous FAD diet fo the century is the Atkins or High Protein diets.  Short term weight loss made these diets so popular that even the medical community has to take a second look.

One new possible side effect of  this FAD-  high protein diet is believed to be neurotoxicity that can possibly lead to premature aging or alzheimers disease. 

In a recent study published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, 2009, 4:40 (21 October 2009), animal studies involving mice that were fed with this kind of diet resulted in having brains that apprently shrank.  This clinically may therefore be relevant to the onset of forgetfulness in the long run to humans.

This study is experimental but may be a signal to further develop a prospective study to elucidate the important effects of a high protein diet in the brain on humans.  Whether this is true to any age group or not remains to be seen.

In my practice, I maybe a maverick in terms of  prescribing a specific diet plan for my pateints BUT ive always been against any FAD diets which I know will only result in short term results rather than long term outcomes.

Better Still… Be Well by Eating Right!

Obesity and Bullying…

September 10, 2009

In one study that looked at overweight children, 60% of boys reported being bullied in school.  Whether children report the incident to their parents or not is another matter. 

So when I give a talk on obesity and the risks associated with having overweight kids, I also emphasize not only the medical aspect of the problem but aso the psychosocial problems associated with childhood obesity. 

Recently a report on the effect of bullying in children was publ;ished in Archives of General Psychiatry, September 7, 2009 issue. It showed that a history of being a victim of bullying at age 8 years among females independently predicted psychiatric hospital treatment and use of antipsychotic, antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs… this association was regardless of psychiatric problems at baseline.

Among males on the other hand , victims of frequent bullying predicted the future use of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs as well as increase  psychiatric hospital treatment and use of antipsychotics.

This new study clearly emphasizes the need for parents to further look at how we feed our children becuase giving in to their desires and wants rather than need can mean a future that is filled with medical risks. 

The association of being overweight and being targets of bullying cant be over emphasized.  There should be a stop somewhere and it should start within the confines of our home…

Teaching them the right amount and the right kind of food means a better future for them both physically and emotionally.

The 20-40 RULE in Fitness and Disease

July 13, 2009

My 20-40 rule:

A low fitness level in your teens translate to a high level of risk for developing diabetes by age 40! 

That’s the message I got from this study published in Diabetes Care called the CARDIA Fitness Study.

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Objective: Test the association of fitness changes over 7- and 20-years on the development of diabetes in middle-age.

Research Design and Methods: Fitness was determined based on the duration of a maximal graded exercise treadmill test (Balke protocol) at up to three examinations over 20-years from 3989 black and white men and women from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study. Relative fitness change (%) was calculated as the difference between baseline and follow-up treadmill duration/baseline treadmill duration. Diabetes was identified as fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, post-load glucose ≥200 mg/dL, or use of diabetes medications.

Results:

  • Diabetes developed at a rate of 4 per 1000 person-years in women (n=149) and men (n=122) and lower baseline fitness was associated with a higher incidence of diabetes in all race-sex groups (hazard ratios from 1.8 to 2.3).
  •  On average, fitness declined 7.6% in women and 9.2% in men over 7 years.
  • The likelihood of developing diabetes increased per standard deviation decrease (19%) from the 7-year population mean change (−8.3%) was in women (hazard ratio [HR]=1.22, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.39) and men (HR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.20, 1.75) following adjustment for age, race, smoking, family history of diabetes, baseline fitness, body mass index (BMI), and fasting glucose.
  • Participants who developed diabetes over 20 years experienced significantly larger declines in relative fitness over 20 years vs those who did not..

Conclusions: Low fitness is significantly associated with diabetes incidence and explained in large part by the relationship between fitness and BMI.

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This study shows that inidviduals risk to develop lifestyle related diseases especially diabetes are at increasing overtime depending on the level of fitness:

  • Women were at 22% increased risk of developing diabetes
  • men were at a 45% increased risk…

 for every standard deviation decrease from the mean fitness change.  This relationship continued to exists even after adjusting for age, smoking, family history of diabetes, and baseline fasting glucose.  In fact the researchers noted that the baseline BMI was a better predictor for developing diabetes than the baseline fasting glucose as well as baseline fitness.

What Do These Data MEAN?

  • If two individuals have similar fitness level; the bigger person with a higher BMI is more likely to develop diabetes than the smaller frame guy overtime in the next 10-20 years.
  •  The possible mechanism by which fitness decreases risk for diabetes is most likely related to the regulation of body mass.  A lower BMI means better insulin sensitivity and less production of toxic substances by increased adiposity that can lead to further cardiovascular complications associated with obesity and diabetes. 

The authors conlcuded:

That regular physical activity to “improve and maintain cardiorespiratory fitness is an important component of a healthy lifestyle.” 

 AMEN!

Walk and Jog or The WOG… A Perfect Exercise!!!

July 7, 2009

Since the time Ive lost weight, Ive been apporached several times by my friends how I did it.  Ive posted in thia website my diet regimen…now I am posting my exercise routine.  To lose weight…the right food and the right discipline are both essential.  To maintain your weight, then the right kind of exercise that you feel good and you can do for years should be the best way to increase your metabolic rate!

Can we call it the WOG?  Short for Walk and Jog!!!

Ive been a brisk walker for sometime.  I find it a good exercise that’s not too tiring nor too destructive for my joints.  But overtime, after several articles touting the benefits of short bouts of exercise in between breaks that I thought of trying to alternate my walking exercise with jogging.

The intensity of exercise is more…the surge of adrenaline is more and boy…you feel better and better everytime you do the routine.  Lots and lots of sweat too!  Besides, you allow you body to rest in between the jogging by brisk walking.

Jogging being a high-intensity exercise kicks your metabolism up and by doing so,  your metabolic rate stays up longer (five times longer after a vigorous workout than after an easy one).   By doing the same routine, one therefore tends to add up the number of calories burned because the jogging can easily add up another 200 calories compared to walking alone.

Here’s what I do:

Before I walk, warming up by stretching the muscles is very important.  Then I start my brisk walking slowly increasing the pace  until I start jogging. 

 I then do the alternate walk and jog routine every 3 minutes until 40 to 40 minutes!!!!  

Initially it may seem “laborious” compared to walking alone but soon…you will be running a marathon as the running becomes easier.  But at this time, I have no plans to pursue a running career!  I just want to burn more calories and make myself healthier and hopefully avoid myself getting the risk of developing diabetes!

To stay Fit and Slim…Discipline is the KEY!

You are What You Eat and Do the WOG!

Can I Eat Eggs Everyday? Yes You Can!!!!

March 28, 2009

New studies have been made to refute the previous claims that eggs can increase ones cholesterol. 

A recent article published in the International Journal of Obesity showed that the previous notion of limiting eggs because they can increase cholesterol is no longer an acceptable fear.  In fact eggs can help one lose weight!

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Objective:

 To test the hypotheses that an egg breakfast, in contrast to a bagel breakfast matched for energy density and total energy, would enhance weight loss in overweight and obese participants while on a reduced-calorie weight loss diet.

Design:

Otherwise healthy overweight or obese participants were assigned to Egg (E), Egg Diet (ED), Bagel (B) or Bagel Diet (BD) groups, based on the prescription of either an egg breakfast containing two eggs (340 kcal) or a breakfast containing bagels matched for energy density and total energy, for at least 5 days per week, respectively. The ED and BD groups were suggested a 1000 kcal energy-deficit low-fat diet, whereas the B and E groups were asked not to change their energy intake.

Results:

After 8 weeks, in comparison to the BD group,

  • the ED group showed a 61% greater reduction in BMI,
  • a 65% greater weight loss ,
  • a 34% greater reduction in waist circumference (P<0.06) and
  • a 16% greater reduction in percent body fat (P=not significant).
  • No significant differences between the E and B groups on the aforementioned variables were obtained.
  • Further, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, did not differ between the groups.

Conclusions:

  The egg breakfast enhances weight loss, when combined with an energy-deficit diet, but does not induce weight loss in a free-living condition. The inclusion of eggs in a weight management program may offer a nutritious supplement to enhance weight loss.
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It is however to be emphasized that in this study, the egg diet was part of a calorie restircted diet suggesting that eating eggs as part of a low calorie diet can help one lose weight.  
  • But the added bonus of the study is the fact that eggs did not have any effect on the blood cholesterol level suggesting that it is really the intake of Saturated fat in the diet found in pastries, cakes and cookies that is harmful to the body!
  • The results of the study  were further confirmed in a similar finding from the University of Surrey research group which showed a similar no effect on cholesterol level with intake of 2 eggs per day for 6 to 8 weeks.
Hopefully…these two studies can now end the debate as to whether eggs are safe to eat or not.  Enjoy!!!!!

Reduce Your Risk for Diabetes Through Weight Loss: The Impact of Weight Loss Surgery

March 9, 2009

Go to fullsize imageWeight gain and Obesity play very important roles in the development of chronic diseases like Diabetes, High blood pressure and complications like Stroke and Heart Attack.  One therefore has to incorporate proper lifestyle and good behavior through daily physical acitvity to help avoid developing these conditions.  However there are certain inidividuas where weight loss through these behvioral methods no longer are enough to provide the weight loss one desires and therefore for ” medical” reasons, one resorts to drastic measures like Bariatric surgery.

But do they work in decreasing the risk? or do they help patients improve disease outcomes?

Now comes s study published in the American Journal of Medicine, March 2009  to show that weight loss indeed can work wonders to diabetes and that bariatric surgery can help:

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  • 621 studies from 1990 to April of 2006 were analyzed:  78.1% of diabetic patients had complete resolution and diabetes was improved or resolved in 86.6% of patients as the result of bariatric surgery.
  •  Gastric banding yielded 56.7% resolution, gastroplasty 79.7%, gastric bypass 80.3% and BPD/DS 95.1%.
  •  After more than 2 year post-operative, the corresponding resolutions were 58.3%, 77.5%, 70.9%, and 95.9%.
  • The Percent excess weight loss was 46.2%, 55.5%, 59.7% and 63.6%, for the type of surgery performed suggesting that BPD yielded the best result.

Concluding that:

  • 82% of patients had resolution of the clinical and laboratory manifestations of diabetes in the first 2 years after surgery, and
  • 62% remained free of diabetes more than 2 years after surgery (80% and 75% for the total group).

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The study for me tells us one thing: that weight loss indeed can work wonders.  However lets not all resort to surgery to achieve improvement in our risk for diseases as surgery also entails risks! 

While proper diet and physical activity are completely free and easy to do…all they need are the Two D’s to succeed: DETERMINATION and DISCIPLINE!

Take Action on Your Weight!!! The Risks Associated with Being Overweight…

February 28, 2009

Go to fullsize imageBeing overweight needs immediate action!  Thats why when I registered a BMI of 25.6 with a fasting blood sugar of 96, I decided to take action and become healthier with my diet and physical activity.  Being overweight carries with it chronic diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol problem.  Not mentioning stroke and heart attack as endpoints!

For year 2009: Its NOW a Global Call to action as more and more children and adolescence are gaining weight.  There’s no time to sit back and relax on this matter as inaction means DISASTER in the long run for these children!

A recent study published in www.bmj.com showed that obese adolescents have the same risk of premature death in adulthood as people who smoke more than 10 cigarettes a day!!!!   This is indeed a scary thought.

Those who are overweight have the same risk as less heavy smokers.

BMI is a measure of your weight according to your height.  For Caucasians, a BMI of >25 if already overweight but for Asians, a lower BMI of 23 is considered abnormal already.

What if one is underweight?

Being underweight carries with it a better prognosis  as it carries with it no increased risk, irrespective of smoking status.  However, if you are also too thin with a a body mass index of less than 17; then it carried with it the same risk of premature death as being overweight.

The study suggests therefore that being OBESE and Overweight at the age of  18 carries the same risk of premature death as being too thin!  Both conditions stem from poor nutrition either too much or too little.

Its not late to start and do something for yourself or for our kids…. NOW!

Life is short..Take time to Take Care of your HEALTH!

Alarming Rise in Adult Diseases Amongst Children….

December 4, 2008

As the world is becoming more obese… as our food industry is creating better marketing strategies to entice people to eat… as we see more children spending more time watching television… not surprisingly, we see more kids suffering from the chronic illnesses not known to kids in last century!

Now new data support our fear that indeed obesity is becoming more prevalent in our region as more international food chains are creeping up and luring our kids with better and bigger processed foods.  In the ned, our own personal health, our kids health and the health of our nation will suffer because we will be spending our fortune in treating the complications of what we have eaten during our lifetime.

A study published in Pediatrics this year is not only alarming but an eye opener…for all of us with kids!!!!

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First-quarter 2002 baseline prevalence of chronic medication use per 1000 child beneficiaries ranged from a high of 29.5 for antiasthmatics to a low of 0.27 for antihyperlipidemics. Except for asthma medication use, prevalence rates were higher for older teens aged 15 to 19 years.

During the study period, the prevalence rate for type 2 antidiabetic agents doubled, driven by 166% and 135% increases in prevalence among females aged 10 to 14 and 15 to 19 years, respectively.

Prevalence of use growth was more moderate for antihypertensives and antidepressants (1.8%). R

Rates of growth were dramatically higher among girls than boys for type 2 antidiabetics (147% vs 39%), 

CONCLUSIONS. Prevalence of chronic medication use in children increased across all therapy classes evaluated. Additional study is needed into the factors influencing these trends, including growth in chronic disease risk factors, greater awareness and screening, and greater affinity toward early use of drug therapy in children.

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Well for me this data say it all.  Where else can one get diabetes at an early age except from the rising prevalence of obesity.  Excess fat results in a state called insulin resistance where the body has to produce more insulin to counteract the resistance by fat to the effect of insulin.  We need insulin to drive sugar inside our muscles to be used for energy!!! 

Simple equation of FAT= Insulin resitance + Diabetes and others.

Others mean: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, hgh uric acid, infertility, increased risk for blood clot, cancer and more…  Meaning, our kids if we let them be with their choices of food nowadays will be taking the medications that our fathers used to take when they were in their 70’s.  A scary though indeed BUT it’s now a reality!

In short… start good nutrition among the young. And have a happy healthy kid.

What Your Waistline Means To Your Health…

November 14, 2008

Go to fullsize imageI just came from a trip to Rio, Brazil to attend the International Congress of Endocrinology which is held every 2-4 years.  Our hotel was stationed right across the Copacobana Beach.  This is a place that epitomizes physical activity where unlike the Waikiki Beach front, I dont see a lot of people swimming but rather engaged in activities like walking, jogging or playing volleyball using their hands or feet.  On the sides are people eateries serving fresh coconut juice but also burgers and fries!  But an interesting observation was that… not a lot of Brazilians can be considered obese and not a lot have their bellies haging out of their waist….

We know about the risk of death and weight and BMI.  For Asians, anything above 23 is considered overweight already and increases ones risk to develop chornic diseases like Diabetes and cancer.  A waistline of more than 36 is considered high risk for men and 34 inches for women for chronic diseases.  It is for this reason that I have been committed to a healthier lifestyle and now from a waistline of 34 , I was able to maintain a waistline of  31inches and my BMI dropped from a high of 25.6 to 23.  It is all about a balance of what you eat and what you do and the DISCIPLINE you put into your goal! 

Now comes a timely study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, November issue regarding the risk of dying based on ones waistline and weight:

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Background Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. Methods We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We used a Cox regression analysis, with age as the time variable, and stratified the models according to study center and age at recruitment, with further adjustment for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and height.

Results During a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 14,723 participants died. The lowest risks of death related to BMI were observed at a BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women.

  • After adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly associated with the risk of death.
  • Relative risks among men and women in the highest quintile of waist circumference were 2.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 2.33) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.56 to 2.04), respectively, and
  • in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio, the relative risks were 1.68 (95% CI, 1.53 to 1.84) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.66), respectively.
  • BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P<0.001).

Conclusions These data suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death.

 

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IN SHORT…The risk of dying was higher among participants with a larger waistline of more than 47.2 inches for men and more than 39.4 inches for women compared to subjects with a smaller waistline of less than 31.5 inches for men and less than 25.6 inches for women. This study showed us that for each 2-inch increase in waist circumference, there was an associated 17% higher risk for death in men and a 13% higher risk for death in women .

There you go guys… thess bulging bellies are no longer as silent as we thought these”fats” can be but rather we know them now as machines producing substances that can harm the heart and vessels.  Aside from trying to aim for a BMI of 23 and below, one therefore has to be more aware of the risk of premasture death with higher waistline! 

Every little loss of the waist circumference can go a along way in helping us maintain HEALTH!  Do somtehting now and reap the rewards along the way!  It requires a lot of discipline but health benefits are enormous…and this equates to what I call Wealth!

How to EAT and Lose Weight….

October 27, 2008

Go to fullsize imageMy previous posts have always been toward trying to help people lose weight.  I am one person following my own theories and they worked and are working up to now.  Here are the no-nonsense tips that I follow DAILY: 

If you want to lose weight…

  • EAT,  But stop when you feel you’re already FULL and Leave the table at once. 
  • CHEW your food properly so it will take time for you to finish a meal and by the time you’re halfway through…you’re FULL! 
  • Avoid the visual stimulation of food… the longer you stay in the table, the more likely you’ll eat more!

Then of course… you MOVE!

A recent article publsihed in the British Medical Journal confirms these basic prinicples:

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Participants 3287 adults (1122 men, 2165 women) aged 30-69 who participated in surveys on cardiovascular risk from 2003 to 2006.

Main outcome measures Body mass index (overweight 25.0) and the dietary habits of eating until full (lifestyle questionnaire) and speed of eating (validated brief self administered questionnaire).

Results 571 (50.9%) men and 1265 (58.4%) women self reported eating until full, and 523 (45.6%) men and 785 (36.3%) women self reported eating quickly. For both sexes the highest age adjusted mean values for height, weight, body mass index, and total energy intake were in the eating until full and eating quickly group compared with the not eating until full and not eating quickly group. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio of being overweight for eating until full was 2.00 (95% confidence interval 1.53 to 2.62) for men and 1.92 (1.53 to 2.40) for women and for eating quickly was 1.84 (1.42 to 2.38) for men and 2.09 (1.69 to 2.59) for women. The multivariable odds ratio of being overweight with both eating behaviours compared with neither was 3.13 (2.20 to 4.45) for men and 3.21 (2.41 to 4.29) for women.

Conclusion Eating until full and eating quickly are associated with being overweight in Japanese men and women, and these eating behaviours combined may have a substantial impact on being overweight.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ There you go…Simple tips and simple measures that will surely WORK for ALL!

Obesity and Forgetfullness: Is There A Link?

October 10, 2008

Go to fullsize imageOtherwise categorized as cosmetic in nature, we now know that being overweight or obese is already a considered a culprit for developing chronic diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer and now dementia.  Increased adiposity or fat cells in the belly results in production of substance known to cause harm meaning, having fat around your belly is a serious matter!

A recent finding on the link between obesity and dementia was recently  published in October issue of Neurology which I want to share with you:

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Background: Numerous reports show that a centralized distribution of adiposity is a more dangerous risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes than total body obesity. No studies have evaluated whether the same pattern exists with dementia. The objective was to evaluate the association between midlife central obesity and risk of dementia three decades later.

Methods: A longitudinal analysis was conducted of 6,583 members of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California who had their sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) measured in 1964 to 1973. Diagnoses of dementia were from medical records an average of 36 years later, January 1, 1994, to June 16, 2006. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, marital status, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, stroke, heart disease, and medical utilization were conducted.

Results: A total of 1,049 participants (15.9%) were diagnosed with dementia.

  • Compared with those in the lowest quintile of SAD, those in the highest had nearly a threefold increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio, 2.72; 95% CI, 2.33–3.33), and this was only mildly attenuated after adding body mass index (BMI) to the model (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.58–2.35).
  • Those with high SAD (>25 cm) and normal BMI had an increased risk (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 0.98–3.81) vs those with low SAD (<25 cm) and normal BMI (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), whereas
  • those both obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) and with high SAD had the highest risk of dementia (HR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.85–4.55).

Conclusions: Central obesity in midlife increases risk of dementia independent of diabetes and cardiovascular comorbidities. Fifty percent of adults have central obesity; therefore, mechanisms linking central obesity to dementia need to be unveiled.

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What this study shows is that: Being overweight and obese combined with increased abdominal fat or BIG bellies , increased risk of dementia by 2.3-fold and 3.6-fold, respectively.  While if one is overweight or obesity but has low or small abdominal fat, the risk is lower: a 1.8-fold increased risk of dementia.

Remember my friends, the risk of dementia increased the heavier you are and the bigger your belly is BUT is worst if you have both!  And mind you, in the study the relationship between dementia and obesity was related to the individual’s weight at midlife!

Am at an almost midlife years so am I so glad that I started my own lifestyle change of being more careful with the food I eat and steady increase in physical activity that my BMI has gone down from 25 to 23 and boy…with good calorie counting, my waistline hs dropped 2 inches!!!! I follow what I preach!

It’s not too late to do changes in our lives…. for the better  !!!

Be Productive At Work But More So With Health!

Socioeconomic Class And the Risk for Cancer….

September 29, 2008

We all know that disease affecting an elderly can differ from the young.  A new study highlights the impact of one socioeconomic status and the risk of common ailments that we dread of having: CANCER.

Here’s an interesting study opublished recently in the BMC-Cancer looking at how ones socioeconomic status can have an impact on ones risk to develop cancer:

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Background

Cancer incidence varies by socioeconomic group and these variations have been linked with environmental and lifestyle factors, differences in access to health care and health seeking behaviour. Socioeconomic variations in cancer incidence by region and age are less clearly understood but they are crucial for targeting prevention measures and health care commissioning.

Results

  • Incidence was highest for the most deprived patients for lung cancer and cervical cancer
  • the opposite was observed for malignant melanoma and breast cancer.
  • The difference in incidence between the most and the least deprived groups was higher for lung cancer patients aged under 65 at diagnosis than those over 65 at diagnosis, which may indicate a cohort effect. 
  •  If the incidence of lung and cervical cancer were decreased to that of the least deprived group it would prevent 36% of lung cancer cases in men, 38% of lung cancer cases in women and 28% of cervical cancer cases.
  • Incidence of breast cancer and melanoma was highest in the least deprived group

Conclusions

National comparison of socioeconomic variations in cancer incidence by region and age can provide an unbiased basis for public health prevention and health commissioning. Decreasing inequalities in incidence requires the integration of information on risk factors, incidence and projected incidence but targeted public health interventions could help to reduce regional inequalities in incidence and reduce the future cancer burden.

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The way we live and the way we practice how we live definitely can have an impact on what diseases will affect our bodies. Breast cancer is noted to be predominant among the wealthy obviously because for me, these people tend to more vigilant in doing yearly exams but more so because they tend to behave not very well in terms of lifetstyle.  I have heard news from relatives to friends who developed breast cancer.

 Look around you and you will see obese women with their obese siblings.  Culture tells us that being a little fat is better and “culturally” better than thin because the “fatness conotes a happy marriage! WHEW! I absolutely DIASGREE! 🙂  and am sure a lot of you are!  I am happily married with three kids BUT I keep it a point to be careful with what I eat including my wife and kids MAKING sure we will not be one of th tagged “obese family” that will increase our chances of getting obesity related diseases like cancer.

Being obese will increase your chances of having a higher circulating estrogen which can increase ones chances to develop breast cancer.  So by keeping oneself fit and avoiding red meat can one improve to lower that risk.

What You Can Afford Does Not Mean It is Healthy!

A Hearty Breakfast Equals Weight Loss?

July 10, 2008

This new study again refutes what has been said about the low carb hype.

We all know the breakfast is an important meal. In this website, I have emphasized that skipping breakfast equals weight gain equals metabolic syndrome. Therefore it is a must that we all have to break the fast to maintain our weight and be healthy.

In the recent convention of the Endocrine Society, one abstract that caught the attention of many was the study comparing the low carb high fat high protein diet versus high carb, high protein low fat diet.

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The low-carb diet allowed 1,085 calories a day with 17 grams of carbohydrates, 51 grams of protein, and 78 grams of fat. Breakfast for members of this group was to be 290 calories with 7 grams of carbohydrates and 12 grams of protein.
The modified form of this diet allowed 1,240 calories a day with less total fat (46 grams) but more carbs (97 grams) and protein (93 grams). The main feature was a 610-calorie “big breakfast” accounting for about half of the daily carbohydrates (58 grams), protein (47 grams), and fat (22 grams).

During the first 16-week weight-loss phase, the big-breakfast group lost about the same amount of weight as the low-carb group (10.6 kg versus 12.6) with no significant difference between groups.

During the following 16-week maintenance phase, though, the groups’ experience diverged. The big-breakfast group continued losing weight and reached an average 21.3% weight loss by the end of the trial (18.1 kg below baseline).

The low-carb group, on the other hand, regained much of the weight lost to end at just 4.5% below baseline (4.3 kg). The protein- and carbohydrate-heavy breakfast appeared to regulate hunger cues, the researchers said.

Visual analog scale scores after breakfast for the two groups were improved with the big-breakfast diet compared with the low carb diet for the following:

  • Hunger (P=0.018)
  • Feeling of still being able to eat a lot more food (P=0.001)
  • Fullness (P=0.001)
  • Satiety (P=0.07)

The difference in fullness extended beyond lunch and through 11 p.m. (P=0.001).

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This study suggests that having a heart high carb and high protein breakfast translates to lesser craving for sweets and lesser hunger.  Again as we emphasized in any weight loss counseling, it is not recommended that patients trying to lose weight are on a dietary regimen that makes them feel hungry.

This is one study that I will wait for the final posting in a peer reviewed journal.  It would be nice to see how the study was conducted and see where the flaws could be and whether this can be translated into clinical practice.

For now…

Eat Your Breakfast To Help You Lose Weight!

Your Weight and Your Risk To Develop Breast Cancer….

March 26, 2008

Go to fullsize imageObesity is one big epidemic that is becoming a huge economic burden due to the medical complications arising form the disease. 

In the recent issue of the the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the relationship between increased weight and the risk of developing breast cancer has been shown to be closely linked:

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Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the association and prognostic value of body mass index (BMI) at the time of initial diagnosis in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). 

Results: 

  • Obese patients tended to have a higher incidence of IBC compared with overweight and normal/underweight groups (P = 0.01). Median follow up was 6 years for all patients.
  • Patients with Locally Advanced Breast Cancer who were obese or overweight had a significantly worse Survival and Recurrence Free Survival (P = 0.001) and a higher incidence of visceral recurrence compared with normal/underweight patients.
  • In a multivariable model, BMI remained significantly associated with both Overall Survival and Recurrence Free Survival for the entire cohort. 

Conclusion: Patients with Locally Advanced Breast Cancer and high BMI have a worse prognosis.

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This study shows us that being obese is more than what we think it is… as mere cosmetics…rather it is a risk factor in itself that can result in a more aggressive type of a disease like breast cancer and can even lead to long term disability like stroke and early death as shown in several studies.

The excess adipose tissue or fat cell results in more circulating estrogen and more inflammatory substances that may be responsible for a more aggressive breast cancer and lesser cancer survival.  We now know that any excess fat cell results in a bigger machinery that produces a lot of substances we never knew about before… that can be harmful to our body!  In short… these fat cells are pretty active and definitely not the passive bystanders that we used to think they are… and therefore need to be dealt with more aggressively!

Another good reason for us to take care and get rid of the FAT….

Be Health and Weight Conscious!