Posts Tagged ‘Sarcopenia’

Being Overweight Predicts Poor Health Outcome with Age

March 14, 2017

A recent study has come out from the recent Epidimeology and Preventive/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific sessions showing that indeed Obesity in the youger age predicts future poor health outcomes.  At most what is affected is poor physical performance including poor walking speed and grip strength.

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“To examine this, Vu and colleagues analyzed findings from participants the Chicago Healthy Aging study, a subset of the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project, which enrolled 39,565 participants from Chicago workplaces who were 18 to 74 during 1967–1973.

The researchers had complete data from 1325 men and women who were examined at baseline and again from 2007 to 2010.

The three measures of physical performance at follow-up were: hand-grip strength, 4-m walking speed, and the SPPB score—a composite score of 4-m walking speed, time to rise from a seated position, and standing balance, for a total score of 0 (worst) to 12 (best).

The participants were classed into six groups depending on their baseline BMI and change in weight after 39 years:

BMI >25 kg/m2; >10-pound weight loss (n=50).

BMI <25 kg/m2; 10-pound weight loss up to a 20-pound weight gain (n=319; reference group; minimal weight change).

BMI <25 kg/m2; >20-pound weight gain (n=312).

BMI >25 kg/m2; >10-pound weight loss (n=130).

BMI >25 kg/m2; 10-pound weight loss up to a 20-pound weight gain (n=300).

BMI >25 kg/m2; >20-pound weight gain (n=214).

About a quarter of the sample (29%) were women and 9% were black.

At follow-up, 10.3% of the participants had a low SPPB score (≤8); 8.4% had slow walking speed (<0.8 m/s on a 4-m course); and 23.8% had low sex-specific handgrip strength (<18 kg for women and <30 kg for men).

Compared with participants with a normal initial BMI and minimal weight change at the follow-up examination, those who were initially overweight and had gained the most weight (>20 pounds) were significantly more likely to have a low SPPB score, a slow walking speed, or low sex-specific handgrip strength (odds ratios 4.55, 4.58, and 1.86, respectively, after adjustment for sex, race, initial cardiovascular disease risk factors, and current age, education, ankle-brachial index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking status, diabetes, cholesterol, and blood-pressure medication use).

Similarly, compared with the reference group, those who were initially overweight or obese and lost less than 10 pounds or gained up to 20 pounds were significantly more likely to have a low SPPB score or a low sex-specific handgrip strength (ORs 2.11 and 1.59, respectively)”

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Bottom line is:

We better shape up and invest in our health for a better physical well being when old age comes!!!!

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