Archive for June, 2009

How To Exercise To Reduce Heart Disease…

June 30, 2009

We heard the news of Michael Jackson’s death.  It is known that Heart disease continues to be a leading killer worldwide.  Blame it to lifestyle and the world’s reliance to fast food and technology.  In parallel to the rise of heart disease is the rising prevalence of Diabetes and Obesity which I believe will no longer spare anyone because of the environment we are in and the kind of acitvities and lifestyle the next generation is in and will have!

It is therefore imperative that we deal with this rising prevalence of heart disease upfront and not relying heavily on medications to get us through!  Simple steps can be done but steps that need diligence, perseverance and discipline!  It is therefore best to start these steps NOW than later!

I myself am doing these steps NOW and not later when I will get the disease of Diabetes due to age and strong family history. 

The recent guideline of the American Heart Association is timing to the events around the world. 

There’s no better time than now to emphasize lifestyle change and exercise but now!  So what do we recommend?

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To improve cardiovascular risk, it is recommended that patients with T2DM accumulate a minimum of 150 minutes per week of at least moderate-intensity and/or 90 minutes per week of at least vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise.

In addition, resistance training should be encouraged. These guidelines can be achieved with varying contributions of moderate- to vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise.

Patients should train on at least 3 nonconsecutive days each week to maximize benefits. Individual sessions should last for no less than 10 minutes.

 Sedentary behaviors should be minimized. Exercise training should be implemented long-term.

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Additional recommendations highlighted in the guidelines include:

  • Resistance training should use all muscle groups and progress to  2–4 sets of 8–10 repetitions at a weight that cannot be lifted >8–10 times, with 1–2 minute rest periods between sets.
  • The duration of each individual session can vary, although the aim should be a minimum of 10 minutes per session, at least 3 sessions per day.
  • Patients who elect to walk should perform the task at a brisk pace to be effective.
  • Go guys… jump on to the bandwagon.  Just look around you.  Lance Gokongwei has joined the fitness world!  So can we!

    It’s in the decision When to start that somehow manages to make us Weak and defenseless. Be determined and do it now. 

    Be Fit…Be Slim…

    Be Smart and Be Healthy!

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    The Balance of Work and Rest

    June 29, 2009

    This month has been extra busy for me.  Usual excuse for having neglected this website for almost a month!!!! 

     After attending the Annual Endocrine Society Convention in Washington DC…  before I overcame my jet lag, I had a scheduled lecture on Diabetes Management in Tagaytay attended by around 250 doctors nationwide.  Then another scheduled lecture within that week in Manila attended by another 250 doctors from Asian Countries in Dusit Hotel.  Immediately after my lecture , I had a scheduled meeting  with the Board of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Philippine Chapter for our joint international meeting in Mactan Shangrila with AACE US in August.  

    Then…. I have to go back to Cebu by that day because it was going to be Fathers Day the nxt day and I promised myself to spend that day with my wife and kids!  And boy did we have FUN!  

    Without asking permission from my kids ( which am sure they wont say YES)  the next day I have to fly back again to Manila to attend another meeting then flew back to Cebu the next day to give another lecture Tuesday night in Marriot Hotel. 

    And in between those scehdules were scheduled meetings with the Pharma Industries Product Managers and National Sales Managers.  WHEW!!!!

    Finally the weekend came!  Rewarding myself with a weekend in Shangrila Mactan with my Saturday off and spending that day for leisure was worth the break I needed.  Spending time with my kids and pampering myself with a massage were rejuventaing enough for another week of work!

    I guess in life… to enjoy one’s work, one has to balance it with fun and rest!  If one has time to spend work with and for others…so much more of a reason that one should and MUST  FIND time for yourself and your family!  I guess it’s an OBLIGATION rather than a LUXURY!

    For me…money should NOT be the sole purpose of living but we USE money to provide a better life for you and your loved ones!  Therefore to achieve that purpose is to prioritize yourself above money and to make sure one has the Best of HEALTH to be able to achieve what you want to pursue in life.  Never should WEALTH take over HEALTH!

    The balancing act in life  maybe difficult but if practiced in ones life… this can lead to a more productive , Healthy and FUN environment for yourself and your loved ones. 

    And if possible…balance your work with rest and fun everyday and every moment you can! 

    Enjoy Your Day Folks… and Glad that AM BACK!

    How To Lower Cholesterol Levels Naturally

    June 3, 2009

    Here’s one interesting article from the Harvard Health Publications HealthBeat on ways we can do to lower cholesterol naturally without meds:

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    15 tips for lowering your cholesterol naturally

    Many factors contribute to the development of heart disease or stroke. Genes and gender play a role, but for most of us, what we eat is an important factor as well. The good news is that a few small changes to your diet can help lower your cholesterol, which in turn will lower your risk for heart disease and stroke. Here are 15 heart-healthy eating tips to help you in the fight against high cholesterol.

    1. Eat meat sparingly. Relegate meat to a minor part of your diet instead of making it the centerpiece of most meals. Trim off fat and skin from meats and poultry. Avoid fatty cuts of beef, pork, and lamb; instead choose lean meats, or substitute fish or skinless white-meat poultry. When dining out, choose a smaller portion of meat, or meatless pasta or fish dishes.

    2. Opt for low-fat dairy products. Avoid dairy foods that contain whole milk or cream; instead, use low-fat or nonfat versions.

    3. Watch the snacks. Choose low-fat snacks (homemade popcorn, carrots, dried fruits, or fresh fruits) instead of high-fat ones (potato chips and candy bars). Avoid store-bought bakery products unless they are explicitly low in saturated fats and free of trans fats.

    4. Cut down on saturated fat in cooking. Use liquid cooking oils rather than butter or margarine. Use nonstick pans. Instead of frying your food, bake, broil, roast, steam, or stew. Discard drippings, and baste with wine or broth.

    5. Avoid palm and coconut oils. Most vegetable oils are unsaturated, but these two contain mostly saturated fat. Choose canola, sunflower, safflower, corn, soybean, olive, and peanut oils.

    6. Reduce dietary cholesterol. Strive to eat less than 200 mg of dietary cholesterol a day. Limit eggs to no more than four egg yolks per week; two egg whites can replace a whole egg in most recipes. Limit lean meat, fish, and poultry to no more than 6 ounces per day (a 3-ounce portion is about the size of a deck of playing cards). Stay away from cholesterol-rich organ meats, such as liver, brains, and kidneys.

    7.  Increase complex carbohydrates and fiber. Emphasize foods with complex carbohydrates—such as fruits and vegetables, whole-grain products, and legumes (dried beans and peas)—that are low in calories and high in fiber. Eat more water-soluble fiber, such as that found in oat bran and fruits. This type of fiber can significantly lower your blood cholesterol level when eaten in conjunction with a low-fat diet.

    8. Eat fruits and vegetables. To protect your heart, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.

    9. Go for nuts. Nuts are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. They’re a healthful and filling source of protein, but go easy on them; they have lots of calories, so too much could cause weight gain.

    10. Add fish to your diet. Countries with high fish consumption have a lower risk of death from all causes as well as from cardiovascular disease. Like nuts, oily fish contain the essential fatty acids known as omega-3s and omega-6s. Since our bodies can’t make these, we have to eat foods that contain them to gain their benefits, which include improved cholesterol levels.

    11. Reduce salt intake. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diets high in salt increase risk of hypertension.

    12. Avoid trans fats. According to the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board, there are no redeeming qualities to trans fats, and no safe levels. They raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol. The National Cholesterol Education Program urges people to eat as little as possible. Avoid or eat only very small quantities of foods that list hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil among their first ingredients. These products contain a lot of trans fat.

    13. Drink alcohol only in moderation. Regular, moderate drinking can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but heavy drinking negates the benefits. Moreover, the advantages aren’t strong enough to recommend alcohol for anyone who doesn’t already drink. For those who do, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend no more than one drink a day for women, and one or two drinks a day for men.

    14. Read labels carefully. Avoid prepared foods that list any of the following among the first few ingredients: meat fat, coconut or palm oil, cream, butter, egg or yolk solids, whole milk solids, lard, cocoa butter, chocolate or imitation chocolate, or hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fat or oil. Watch out for fast foods and other unlabeled products; when you don’t know what you’re getting, eat sparingly.

    15. Change strategies. If three months of healthy eating doesn’t bring your total and LDL cholesterol levels into the desired range, consult your physician and a dietitian. If the numbers still don’t budge after six months, it may be time to consider medication.

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    Simple measures we can at home to avoid getting th compications associated with a high cholestrol level in the blood.  High cholesterol levels have been shown to increase ones risk to suffer from stroke and heart attack. 

    The good news is , we now have ways to control and lower the cholestrol levels by taking care of what we eat and through medications.

    Be Health Smart and Check the Labels!